CHOOSE YOUR

Own Adventure

Named for the Saura Indians who were early inhabitants of the region, the Sauratown Mountains are the remnants of a once-mighty range of peaks. Over many millions of years, wind, water and other forces wore down the lofty peaks. What remains of these ancient mountains is the erosion-resistant quartzite, which now supports scenic ridges and knobs, including Moore’s Knob, Moore’s Wall, Cook’s Wall, Devil’s Chimney, Wolf Rock and Hanging Rock.

In 1936, the Stokes County Committee for Hanging Rock and the Winston – Salem Foundation donated 3,096 acres of land to the state of North Carolina for the purpose of establishing a state park. Additional land was added to the park as recently as 2015, bringing total acreage to more than 7,000

Funds from the $35 million state parks bond referendum approved by voters in 1993 paid for construction of Hanging Rock’s new visitor’s center. The fully accessible stone and wood structure offers an auditorium, exhibit room and a classroom for interpretation and education programs. It also houses the park office and serves as a contact station for the thousands who visit the park each year.

MORE INFORMATION

December, January, February:
7am-7pm

March, April:
7am-9pm

May, June, July,
August, September:
7am-10pm

October:
7am-9pm

November:
7am-8pm

Things to Do

Things to Do

CAMPING

The park offers tent, trailer, and group primitive campsites. One site is wheelchair accessible. Recreational vehicle hookups and dump stations are not provided. A short road from the family campground leads to 10 family vacation cabins accommodating up to six people each. Two cabins are handicapped accessible. During the spring, winter and fall the cabin may be rented by the night with a two-night minimum stay or by the week. Summer rentals are available by the week only. Pets are not allowed in the cabin or cabin area.

Things to Do

HIKING

Hiking: More than 20 miles of wooded passageways form a network of trails at Hanging Rock State Park. Picturesque cascades and waterfalls, high rock cliffs, spectacular views and a mountain cave are just a few of the rewards of exploring by foot. Persons with mobility disabilities will enjoy a short wheelchair accessible trail leading to the Rock Garden outcrop.

Things to Do

ROCK CLIMBING

Rock Climbing: Cook’s Wall and Moore’s Wall, a series of cliffs up to 400 feet high and extending almost two miles, provide opportunities for experienced climbers. All other areas of the park are closed to climbing and rappelling. Climbers must register before beginning a climb and must use proper equipment and safety techniques. North Carolina State Parks do not maintain routes or anchors

Things to Do

BIKING

The park offers tent, trailer, and group primitive campsites. One site is wheelchair accessible. Recreational vehicle hookups and dump stations are not provided. A short road from the family campground leads to 10 family vacation cabins accommodating up to six people each.Two cabins are handicapped accessible. During the spring, winter and fall the cabin may be rented by the night with a two-night minimum stay or by the week. Summer rentals are available by the week only. Pets are not allowed in the cabin or cabin area

Things to Do

PICNICKING

Two picnic areas offer 15 grills each and 60 picnic sites in total. There is one wheelchair accessible picnic table here. Drinking water and restrooms are near both picnic areas. The refreshment stand at the lake is open during the summer. Shelters for group picnics are located in both picnic areas. Shelters offer tables, grills, and fireplaces and if not reserved are available on a first-occupied basis free of charge. A fee is charged for groups preferring to reserve a shelter